CFP: Evidence of Power in the Ruler Portrait, 14th - 18th Cent. (1-2 Dec 17)

Munich / München, Zentralinstitut für Kunstgeschichte, 01. - 02.12.2017
Eingabeschluss: 30.04.2017

Head and Body: Evidence of Power in the Ruler Portrait Between the 14th and 18th Centuries

Kopf und Körper: Evidenzen der Macht im Herrscherporträt des 14.-18 Jahrhunderts

Conference Concept (short version) / Deutsche Fassung siehe unten!

What meanings do head and body convey in the medieval and early modern ruler portrait? How do its mimetic schemes and visual projections of power relate to each other? How are conceptually abstract norms and values of rulership transposed to categories of looking, how do images of bodies concretize these norms and values, and what modes of representation do they cultivate? Research on the history of portraits has relegated these questions to the margins; we presently lack a systematic analysis. Nevertheless, head and body forged central attributes and categories for physical manifestations of rulership in the Middle Ages and early modern period. The specific conditions of their visual portrayal is therefore of particular interest. Unlike in republican or democratic political systems, where the presence and legitimation of ruling power is supported by an elected government or a constitution, in principalities and monarchies the prince or king himself guaranteed the legitimacy of his own rule. He did this above all else through his physical body, whose visually and haptically experienced presence first lent the necessary evidence for his sovereignty.
The conference should comprehensively thematize the different normative, material, medial, functional, and aesthetic aspects of the corporeal and material presence of rulership in painted and printed ruler portraits from the fourteenth to the eighteenth centuries.

Scientific Management:
Prof. Dr. Matthias Müller (Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz)
Prof. Dr. Ulrich Pfisterer (Ludwig Maximilians-Universität München),
Dr. Elke Anna Werner (Freie Universität Berlin)

Conference languages: German and English

Applications for a lecture with an abstract of max. 3,000 characters can be sent until April 30 2017 to the following address

Prof. Dr. Matthias Müller
Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz
Institut für Kunstgeschichte und Musikwissenschaft
Abteilung Kunstgeschichte
Georg-Forster-Gebäude
Jakob-Welder-Weg 12
55128 Mainz
Email: mattmueluni-mainz.de

Conference Concept (long version) / Deutsche Fassung siehe unten!

What meanings do head and body convey in the medieval and early modern ruler portrait? How do its mimetic schemes and visual projections of power relate to each other? How are conceptually abstract norms and values of rulership transposed to categories of looking, how do images of bodies concretize these norms and values, and what modes of representation do they cultivate? Research on the history of portraits has relegated these questions to the margins; we presently lack a systematic analysis. Nevertheless, head and body forged central attributes and categories for physical manifestations of rulership in the Middle Ages and early modern period. The specific conditions of their visual portrayal is therefore of particular interest. Unlike in republican or democratic political systems, where the presence and legitimation of ruling power is supported by an elected government or a constitution, in principalities and monarchies the prince or king himself guaranteed the legitimacy of his own rule. He did this above all else through his physical body, whose visually and haptically experienced presence first lent the necessary evidence for his sovereignty.
Then again the body of the prince or king represented only the apex of a larger familial group, whose dynastic body likewise possessed a centuries-old genealogical dimension. The fundamentally non-republican and non-democratic nature of manifestations of rule shaped how the medium of portraiture represented the ruler’s body. Ruler portraiture had, on the one hand, to model Plato and Laktanz’s ideal corporeality of sovreignly virtue, and on the other hand—via reference to the genealogical-dynastic body—to visualize the concrete corporeality of a physically strong regent. The two imperatives sometimes intersected, stirring tension and conflict. Inherited, culturally determined, and semantically connoted modes of representation clashed with changing art-theoretical and technical norms. This is particularly visible in the new paradigms of mimesis that developed in Italy, France and the Burgundian Netherlands in the late Middle Ages and proliferated across Europe during the sixteenth century. Exemplary cases include the famous likeness of Jean le Bon in the Louvre, Piero della Francesca’s Montefeltre Diptych, Bernhard Strigel’s portraits for Emperor Maximilian I, Hans Holbein the Younger’s likeness of Henry VIII of England, or François Clouet’s images of the French King Francis I. These portraits show a notable discrepancy between head and body, a disparity that arises from diverging modes of visualization and representation as well as different concepts of mimesis.
Mimetic divergence and heterogeneity only increase when the presence of the princely body is underscored through emphasis on the materiality of clothing and accessories, while the head remains subordinated to abstract typologizing. Such perspicuous hybridizations grow particularly pronounced when the ruler portrait is produced by a European artist but commissioned by a non-European regent. An informative example of this phenomenon is Gentile Bellini’s portrait of the Ottoman Sultan Mehmet II, painted in 1480 (London, National Gallery). Such likenesses, which also include early modern portraits of Chinese emperors inspired by European models, allow us to discuss the manifold facets of reciprocal processes of artistic and cultural transfer and transformation between European and non-European ruler portraits. Representations of female rulers, princes, and lower nobility boast an even greater variety of idiosyncratic concepts of power, mimesis, and evidence, as in the exceptional, non-genealogical case of the head and body of the Pope or Bishop.
Herein lies the challenge of the conference: it should comprehensively thematize the different normative, material, medial, functional, and aesthetic aspects of the corporeal and material presence of rulership in painted and printed ruler portraits from the fourteenth to the eighteenth centuries. Crucial to this endeavor is the question of how the relationship between the natural, political, and often sacral body of the ruler is handled in different political and social contexts and relations, in a medium that performs its own specific material presence and forms of evidentiary persuasion. The period under consideration ranges from the beginning of mimetically-oriented ruler portraiture as an autonomous category of representation in the late Middle Ages to the end of the Ancien Régime in France, where the execution of Louis XVI also marked a caesura in the treatment of the kingly body as a pictorial subject. Although portraiture in European countries and territories stands at the center of this investigation, it is nevertheless an object of the conference to compare European with non-European concepts of portraiture, and thereby reveal commonalities and differences as well as mechanisms of cultural transfer between European and non-European ruler portraiture.

Tagungskonzept (Kurzfassung; ausführliche Fassung siehe unten!)

Welche Bedeutung besitzen Kopf und Körper in den Porträtkonzepten mittelalterlicher und frühneuzeitlicher Herrscherporträts? Wie verhalten sich mimetische Konzepte und visuelle Entwürfe von Macht zueinander, wie werden begrifflich-abstrakte Normen und Werte von Herrschaft in Anschauungskategorien überführt, woran machen sie sich in den Körperbildern fest, welche Darstellungsmodi bilden sich aus? Diese Fragen wurden in den Untersuchungen zur Geschichte des Porträts bislang nur am Rande gestreift, eine systematische Analyse fehlt bis heute. Für die physische Manifestation von Regentschaft im Mittelalter und der Frühen Neuzeit bildeten Kopf und Körper jedoch zentrale Merkmale und Kategorien des Herrschaftsverständnisses. Ihre spezifische bildliche Wiedergabe ist daher von besonderem Interesse. Denn anders als in republikanisch oder demokratisch verfassten Staatswesen, wo sich die Präsenz und Legitimation herrschaftlicher Macht auf eine gewählte Regierung und eine Verfassung stützt, garantierte in Fürstenherrschaften und Monarchien in erster Linie der Fürst oder König selbst für die Souveränität und Rechtmäßigkeit seiner Regentschaft. Er tat dies vor allem mit seinem physischen Körper, dessen visuell und haptisch erlebbare Präsenz seiner Herrschaft erst die notwendige Evidenz verlieh.
Auf der Tagung sollen die verschiedenen normativen, materiellen, medialen, funktionalen und ästhetischen Aspekte körperlicher bzw. körperhafter und dinglich-materieller Präsenz von Herrschaft in den gemalten und gedruckten Bildnissen von Regenten und Regentinnen vom 14. bis zum 18. Jahrhundert thematisiert werden.

Wissenschaftliche Leitung:
Prof. Dr. Matthias Müller (Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz)
Prof. Dr. Ulrich Pfisterer (Ludwig Maximilians-Universität München),
Dr. Elke Anna Werner (Freie Universität Berlin)

Tagungssprachen: Deutsch und Englisch

Bewerbungen für einen Vortrag mit einem Abstract von max. 3.000 Zeichen können bis zum 30.4.2017 an folgende Adresse geschickt werden:

Prof. Dr. Matthias Müller
Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz
Institut für Kunstgeschichte und Musikwissenschaft
Abteilung Kunstgeschichte
Georg-Forster-Gebäude
Jakob-Welder-Weg 12
55128 Mainz
Email: mattmueluni-mainz.de

Tagungskonzept (ausführliche Fassung)

Welche Bedeutung besitzen Kopf und Körper in den Porträtkonzepten mittelalterlicher und frühneuzeitlicher Herrscherporträts? Wie verhalten sich mimetische Konzepte und visuelle Entwürfe von Macht zueinander, wie werden begrifflich-abstrakte Normen und Werte von Herrschaft in Anschauungskategorien überführt, woran machen sie sich in den Körperbildern fest, welche Darstellungsmodi bilden sich aus? Diese Fragen wurden in den Untersuchungen zur Geschichte des Porträts bislang nur am Rande gestreift, eine systematische Analyse fehlt bis heute. Für die physische Manifestation von Regentschaft im Mittelalter und der Frühen Neuzeit bildeten Kopf und Körper jedoch zentrale Merkmale und Kategorien des Herrschaftsverständnisses. Ihre spezifische bildliche Wiedergabe ist daher von besonderem Interesse. Denn anders als in republikanisch oder demokratisch verfassten Staatswesen, wo sich die Präsenz und Legitimation herrschaftlicher Macht auf eine gewählte Regierung und eine Verfassung stützt, garantierte in Fürstenherrschaften und Monarchien in erster Linie der Fürst oder König selbst für die Souveränität und Rechtmäßigkeit seiner Regentschaft. Er tat dies vor allem mit seinem physischen Körper, dessen visuell und haptisch erlebbare Präsenz seiner Herrschaft erst die notwendige Evidenz verlieh.
Dabei stellte der Körper des Fürsten oder Königs wiederum nur die Spitze eines größeren familiären Personenverbandes dar, dessen dynastischer Körper zugleich eine über Jahrhunderte zurückreichende genealogische Dimension besaß. Diese Grundkonstitutive nichtrepublikanischer und nichtdemokratischer Herrschaftspräsenz hatte Konsequenzen für die Darstellungsweise des Herrscherkörpers im Medium des Bildnisses. Es musste sowohl im Sinne Platons und Laktanz‘ die ideale Körperlichkeit herrschaftlicher Tugend modellieren als auch – durchaus unter Bezug auf den genealogisch-dynastischen Körper - die konkrete Körperlichkeit eines auch physisch starken Regenten visualisieren. Dabei konnten sich Spannungen und Konflikte ergeben. Diese resultierten auf der einen Seite aus der Wirksamkeit von tradierten, kulturell vorgeprägten und spezifisch semantisch konnotierten Darstellungsmodi und auf der anderen Seite aus veränderten Ansprüchen und Normen kunsttheoretischer und künstlerisch-technischer Konzepte, wie sie sich besonders mit dem Paradigma der Mimesis seit dem späten Mittelalter in Italien, Frankreich und den burgundischen Niederlanden entwickeln und ab dem 16. Jahrhundert europaweit rezipiert werden. Anschauliche Beispiele hierfür sind das berühmte Bildnis von Jean le Bon im Louvre, Piero della Francescas Montefeltre-Diptychon, Bernhard Strigels Bildnisse für Kaiser Maximilian I., Hans Holbeins d. J. Bildnisse Heinrichs VIII. von England oder François Clouets Porträts des französischen Königs Franz. I. In diesen Bildnissen lässt sich eine auffällige Diskrepanz zwischen Kopf und Körper konstatieren, deren divergierende mimetische Präsenz offensichtlich aus der Kombination divergierender Porträt- und Darstellungsmodi und unterschiedlicher Mimesiskonzepte herrührt.
Die mimetische Divergenz und Heterogenität wird zusätzlich gesteigert, wenn in den Bildnissen die Präsenz des herrschaftlichen Körpers durch eine explizite Herausstellung der Materialität von Kleidung und Accessoires betont wird, während der Kopf eher einer abstrahierenden Typisierung unterworfen ist. Besonders auffällig werden solche offenkundigen Hybridisierungen bei Herrscherporträts, die zwar von europäischen Künstlern hergestellt, jedoch von nichteuropäischen Regenten in Auftrag gegeben wurden. Ein aufschlussreiches Beispiel hierfür ist das 1480 von Gentile Bellini gemalte Bildnis des osmanischen Sultans Mehmet II. (London, National Gallery). Anhand von solchen Porträts, zu denen auch die europäisch inspirierten frühneuzeitlichen Bildnisse chinesischer Kaiser gehören, lassen sich auch die vielfältigen Facetten von wechselseitigen künstlerischen wie kulturellen Transfer- und Transformationsprozessen zwischen europäischen und außereuropäischen Herrscherporträts diskutieren. Das Spektrum und die Spezifik der Herrscherporträts und der damit verbundenen Konzepte von Macht, Mimesis und Evidenz ist durch die Einbeziehung der Darstellungen von Herrscherinnen, von Prinzen und nachgeordneten Adligen zu erweitern und durch eine vergleichende Betrachtung zu schärfen – selbst den ‚nicht-genealogische Sonderfall‘ von Kopf und Körper des Papstes oder Bischofs im Bild gilt es zu bedenken.
Darin besteht die Herausforderung der Tagung: Sie soll in diesem umfassenden Sinn die verschiedenen normativen, materiellen, medialen, funktionalen und ästhetischen Aspekte körperlicher bzw. körperhafter und dinglich-materieller Präsenz von Herrschaft in den gemalten und gedruckten Herrscherbildnissen vom 14. bis zum 18. Jahrhundert thematisieren. Untrennbar damit verbunden ist die Frage, wie in unterschiedlichen politisch-gesellschaftlichen Kontexten und Begründungszusammenhängen das Verhältnis von natürlichem, politischem und oft auch sakralem Körper des Herrschers bzw. der Herrscherin als einem Medium, das über eine eigene materielle Präsenz und über spezifische Formen der Evidenzerzeugung verfügt, im Bild verhandelt wird. Die Grenzen des gewählten Untersuchungszeitraums ergeben sich dabei aus dem Beginn einer mimetisch orientierten, den Herrscherkörper als Darstellungskategorie berücksichtigenden Porträtkunst im späten Mittelalter und dem Ende des Ancien Regime in Frankreich, wo die Guillotinierung Ludwigs XVI. auch eine Zäsur im Umgang mit dem königlichen Körper markierte. Wenn auch die Porträtkunst der europäischen Länder und Territorien im Mittelpunkt steht, ist es doch zugleich ein Anliegen der Tagung, die europäischen Bildniskonzepte in einen Vergleich mit außereuropäischen Konzepten zu stellen und die dabei erkennbaren Gemeinsamkeiten und Divergenzen sowie die Transferprozesse sowohl für die europäischen als auch die außereuropäischen Herrscherbildnisse in den Blick zu nehmen.

Quellennachweis:
CFP: Evidence of Power in the Ruler Portrait, 14th - 18th Cent. (1-2 Dec 17). In: ArtHist.net, 07.03.2017. Letzter Zugriff 12.12.2017. <https://arthist.net/archive/14910>.

Beiträger: Prof. Dr. Matthias Müller, Universität Mainz, Kunsthist. Institut

Beitrag veröffentlicht am: 07.03.2017

Empfohlene Zitation

Zu Facebook hinzufügen